Confidentiality vs Secret Keeping in Group Therapy

Without guidance it’s easy for members of group therapy to do old patterns of secret keeping when trying to maintain confidentiality. Clients, especially those with parents that experienced trauma and/or addiction, may have been instructed as a child to not speak about what goes on at home. Without a clear explanation of what is okay to speak about in regards to group therapy, it’s easy to repeat historic patterns. When asked about a group, and a client says “I’m not allowed to talk about it”, that’s actually not true. So what can clients speak about while maintaining confidentiality of other group members?

General Topic

It’s important for clients to be able to speak about the topics covered in group therapy. Speaking about general topics, such as childhood trauma and the long term impacts, can support the client in educating their support network about what they are working on and ways others can offer them support.

Their Experiences

Clients may speak about their personal experience in group therapy. It’s important for clients to be able to speak about their insights, challenges, hopes, and practices to others in their life.

The Therapist

While the therapist must maintain confidentiality of all group members, and group members must maintain confidentiality of all other group members. Anything the therapist says or does may be talked about to others. Clients are encouraged to bring up concerns or disagreements to the therapist and practice direct communication. The clients may relate lessons or stories shared by the therapist to others. 

Finally, it’s also important to speak to and have a written agreement about the consequence of not maintaining confidentiality.

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